Chinese Rubbings Collection

Story of recovering a bronze ding tripod from a river bottom: Wu shi zuo shi shi di san shi you duan (Wu shi ci zuo shi shi dong bi xia shi hua xiang you duan.): Wu shi ci hua xiang: Wu shi ci shi shi hua xiang: Wu shi mu qun shi ke: Wu Liang Ci hua xiang: Sheng ding tu

Creator/Contributor:
Wu Liang, 78-151, Chinese, associated name, associated name
Qin Shihuang, Reign dates: 246-210 B.C., Chinese, associated name, associated name
Warner, Langdon, 1881-1955, American, associated name, associated name
Creation Date:
19th cent.-early 20th cent.
Description:
Rubbing from pictorial relief carving-- depicting the first Qin Emperor unsuccessfully attempting to recover a bronze tripod vessel (ding) from a river bottom. According to the legend, the tripod was part of the ceremonial gear of the previous Zhou kingdom, but just as the workers pull it from the water, a dragon severs the rope and the tripod falls back in. From the shrine of Wu Rong at the Wu Family Shrines, Jiaxiang, Shandong from 1st. year of Jianhe, Eastern Han Dynasty (147).
Extent:
70 x 109 cm
Language:
No linguistic content
Genre:
rubbings
Digital Format:
Images
Subjects:
Wu Liang ci, Jiaxiang Xian, Shandong Sheng, China
vessels
bronzes
shrine houses
wall paintings
human figures
rivers
birds
boats
chariots
horse-drawn vehicles
horsemen and horsewomen
horsemen
horses
fish
family
Culture:
Chinese
Style Period:
Eastern Han
Minguo
Qing
Materials/Techniques:
ink
paper
relief
Notes:
Citation/references: Chavanne, E. Mission archaeologique dans la chine septentrionale ; pl. 163. ; Zhongguo hua xiang shi quan ji, 2000, V. 1, pl. 77. ; Zhonghua shu xue da ci dian, 2000, p. 345 (Wu shi ci shi shi hua xiang).
General note: Wu shi ci: Shrine of Wu Family, located north of Wuzhaishan Village, Zhifang Town, Jiaxiang County, Shandong Province, China. Wushi Shrine is one of the earliest examples of the offering shrines erected at the Wu family graves. The monuments were erected in the middle of 2nd century AD, buried due to Yellow River flooding, and were not fully discovered until 1786 by Huang Yi, a Qing sholar and high official. The shrine was a free-standing, peak-roofed structure. ; Stone reliefs in the Wu Family Shrines were carved on the walls of the offering shrines, more than 40 engraved wall registers of slabs (16 stabs in the front chamber- Wu Rong Shrine, 17 slabs in the left chamber and 6 slabs in the Wu Liang Shrine) ; 2 pillars and 2 stone lions also appear.
Historical: Stele Date: 4th. day of 3rd. mo. of 1st. year of Jianhe, Eastern Han Dynasty (147).
Repository:
Fine Arts Library, Special Collections, Harvard University
HOLLIS Record:
https://id.lib.harvard.edu/images/olvwork297759/urn-3:FHCL:1092735/catalog
Record ID:
W297759_urn-3:FHCL:1092735