Immigration to the United States, 1789-1930

Historical aspects of the immigration problem: select documents

Creator/Contributor:
Abbott, Edith, 1876-1957
Place Of Origin:
Illinois
Chicago
Publisher:
The University of Chicago Press
Creation Date:
1926
Extent:
xx, 881 p. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Digital Format:
Books and documents
Contents:
I. Causes of emigration: emigration conditions in the United Kingdom and northern Europe : 1. Recruiting German immigrants 1749-50 -- 2. Stimulating emigration in London in the eighteenth century -- 3. What America offered to the poor of Europe -- 4. A letter from America 1796 -- 5. An attempt to discourage emigration 1796 -- 6. Letter from Welsh immigrants in Pennsylvania 1800 -- 7. French immigrants in the wilderness -- 8. Emigration from England in 1816 -- 9. Letters from emigrants -- 10. Opportunities of a farmer in Illinois -- 11. Words of caution to immigrants -- 12. Emigration conditions in Germany and Switzerland -- 13. Emigration for political reasons -- 14. Attractions of pioneer life in Missouri -- 15. Germans ask to come as "redemptioners" 1827 -- 16. Emigration conditions in certain English counties -- 17. Emigration proposed for scotch weavers -- 18. Emigration conditions in Ireland 1824-26 -- 19. Some newspaper comments on emigration --^
20. Letters from pauper immigrants -- 21. Emigration form the United Kingdom -- 22. Emigration and Irish destitution 1836-37 -- 23. Methods of stimulating emigration 1837 -- 24. Overpopulation and emigration in the United Kingdom -- 25. General causes of German emigration -- 26. Why the United States attracts emigrants -- 27. State aid for Irish emigration condemned -- 28. Colonization preferred to emigration -- 29. The Irish famine exodus of 1847 -- 30. The distressed condition of Ireland -- 31. Irish emigration assisted by Irish landlords -- 32. The continuing emigration from the United Kingdom -- 33. Stimulation of emigration by American states : Report of the Wisconsin commissioner of emigration ; Report of the Wisconsin committee on immigration -- 34. The work of A German emigration society -- 35. What does North America offer to the German emigrant? -- 36. Advice to immigrants -- 37. Difficulty of regulating emigration -- 38. Causes of European emigration --^
39. Causes of Swiss emigration -- 40. Emigration of capital and labor -- 41. A later view of emigration from the United Kingdom -- 42. A Swedish immigrant in his old home -- 43. Efforts to attract immigrants to a western state -- 44. Emigration as a remedy for economic distress -- 45. Effect of "hard times" on emigration -- 46. Emigration from Württemberg 1870-80 -- 47. Review of German emigration --
II. Economic aspects of the immigration problem : 1. Redemptioners and indentured servants : Comments of a Swedish traveler ; Comments of an English traveler ; Contracts of immigrant "redemptioners" ; Public opinion and the redemptioners -- 2. Opportunities in England and America compared -- 3. British opinion of the dangers of emigration -- 4. Immigration following the peace of 1815 -- 5. How an emigrant may succeed in the United States -- 6. English pioneers in Illinois -- 7. Advice to emigrants -- 8. An Englishman in the western country -- 9. Letters of English paupers -- 10. Emigration of skilled workmen -- 11. Economic opportunities of the United States and Canada -- 12. “Reflections on the subject of emigration” -- 13. Economic advantages of emigration to the mother country -- 14. Opportunities for immigrants in agriculture -- 15. Advice to German emigrants -- 16. Voluntary and state-aided emigration discussed -- 17. Proposals for a Canadian agent in New York --^
18. Employment for newly arrived immigrants -- 19. Influence of emigration upon labor and prices in England -- 20. Immigration and wages -- 21. Immigration harmful to the American laborer -- 22. An Irish view of the immigrant’s opportunities -- 23. Advice to emigrants -- 24. Advice to Germans contemplating emigration -- 25. The educated German in America -- 26. Emigration and population statistics -- 27. Emigration in relation to overpopulation in Germany -- 28. Occupations of immigrants viewed unfavorably -- 29. Immigration and labor: a know nothing-view -- 30. Immigrants in New York City -- 31. Distribution of immigrants -- 32. The foreign element in Massachusetts -- 33. Report on the encouragement of immigration -- 34. Common labor in New York -- 35. Scarcity of skilled labor in New York -- 36. Immigration and the labor in the United States -- 37. Immigration and the labor market -- 38. The effects of continuous emigration upon Ireland -- 39. Occupations of immigrants --^
40. Capital value of immigration -- 41. An official estimate of the value of an immigrant -- 42. Opportunities for emigrants 1870 -- 43. The rationale of emigration -- 44. Effect of the industrial development of Germany on emigration -- 45. The effects of emigration in Europe and America -- 46. Immigration and American prosperity -- III. Early problems of assimilation : 1. Colonial misgivings -- 2. What is an American? -- 3. The Pennsylvania Germans -- 4. Thoughts on the policy of encouraging migration -- 5. The population of New York 1812 -- 6. The "anglicizing" of the Germans in America -- 7. A German political exile on the problem of assimilation -- 8. Difficulties of assimilation -- 9. A "Native American" view -- 10. A German traveler's impressions -- 11. Difficulties of adjustment -- 12. A plea for the Irish immigrant -- 13. Irish attitude to know-nothingism -- 14. The disbanding of foreign militia companies -- 15. "The foreign vote" a reply to the know-nothings --^
16. Irish nationalism in the United States -- 17. Loyalty of immigrants to the home country -- 18. A German criticism of German-Americans -- 19. The German emigrant in America -- 20. The Germans in Texas -- 21. Immigrant organizations in politics -- 22. Difficulties of the Irish in the New Anglo-American world -- 23. Isolation of the Irish in America -- 24. The foreign element in American society -- 25. The immigrant’s obligations in the "old country" -- 26. The importance of the German language and the German press 1869 -- 27. The Irish-American -- 28. Position of the Irish in America: an English view -- IV. Pauperism and crime and other domestic immigration problems : 1. An attempted exclusion of convicts in the colonial period : Virginia ; Maryland ; Pennsylvania -- 2. Pauper and convict immigration: a colonial statute -- 3. Demand for an immigrant hospital 1741 -- 4. Sick Germans in Philadelphia 1754 -- 5. Charitable schools for immigrants --^
6. A society for assisting emigrants -- 7. Destitution among immigrants in New York -- 8. Importation of paupers -- 9. A Baltimore protest against foreign pauperism -- 10. Irish laborers charged with violence -- 11. The problem of foreign pauperism -- 12. Naturalizing by the job -- 13. Destitution among immigrants -- 14. A demand for control of foreign pauperism in Massachusetts -- 15. Cholera in the Boston slums 1849 -- 16. Recommendations of Massachusetts sanitary commission -- 17. Immigration and crime -- 18. Foreign pauperism -- 19. Destitute foreigners at the New York dispensary -- 20. Insanity in Massachusetts among the native and foreign-born -- 21. Immigration and "juvenile vacancy" -- 22. Immigrant pauperism vied tolerantly -- 23. Election riots -- 24. The "know-nothing" demand for a change in naturalization -- 25. The immigrant and the tenement house problem -- 26. A German prisoners’ aid Society -- 27. Protest against the immigration of foreigner criminals --^
28. Misuse of naturalization privileges -- 29. The government of our great cities -- 30. Immigration, indigence, and crime in New York -- 31. Foreign convicts in New York -- 32. Mortality of immigrants -- 33. The "Molly Maguires" -- 34. Alien paupers in New York -- 35. Further complaints of the burden of alien pauperism 1880 -- 36. Evils indecent to immigration --
V. Public opinion and the immigrant : 1. Complaints of the Pennsylvania colonial assembly -- 2. A statement’s calculations -- 3. Immigration and the needs of the new nation -- 4. A charity sermon for poor emigrants -- 5. Congressional opinion 1797 -- 6. Prejudice against aliens -- 7. Hints to immigrants -- 8. Congress petitioned by Irish immigrants -- 9. Too many immigrants -- 10. The spirit of our government as it relates to foreigners -- 11. Immigrants welcomed in western Pennsylvania -- 12. Immigrants the dupes of demagogues -- 13. Dangers of immigration suggested -- 14. A sympathetic view of the Irish immigrant -- 15. A congressman’s view of naturalization -- 16. The "Native American" declaration principles -- 17. An American criticism of "Native Americans" -- 18. The “Native American” in congress -- 19. Anxiety about immigration: a moderate view -- 20. A liberal view of the alien and American life -- 21. Opinion in the south -- 22. A western forecast of the results of emigration -- 23. The immigrant and public lands 1852 -- 24. A sympathetic view of immigration -- 25. The position of the “American party” -- 26. America for Americans -- 27. Who are the Americans? -- 28. "Know-nothingisms" contrary to American tradition -- 29. National hospitality -- 30. Immigrants welcomed -- 31. The humbug of know-nothings -- 32. A democratic reply to the know-nothings -- 33. A German view of the know-nothing movement -- 34. An Irish view of "know-nothingism" -- 35. European immigration- the Grecian horse of the American republic -- 36. Conclusions of a federal investigating committee 1856 -- 37. Immigrants in New York City -- 38. Federal encouragement of immigration -- 39. Free trade in men -- 40. A businessman’s views of “our duties to immigrants” 1875 -- 41. Views of state charitable officials -- 42. Importance of the increase in immigration -- 43. Current opinion 1882-83 -- 44. Federal control recommended.
Subjects:
Aliens--United States
Immigrants--United States
United States--Emigration and immigration
Notes:
Includes bibliographical references.
Attribution:
[compiled] by Edith Abbott.
Series:
Social service series
Open Collections Program at Harvard University
Classification:
JV6455 .A68
325.73
Repository:
History Departmental Library, Harvard University
Harvard Law School Library, Harvard University
Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University
Widener Library, Harvard University
Record ID:
990021732180203941
HOLLIS Record:
https://id.lib.harvard.edu/alma/990021732180203941/catalog